ox.y.mo.ron.ic

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Until you’re about the age of twenty, you read everything, and you like it simply because you are reading it. Then between twenty and thirty you pick what you want, and you read the best, you read all the great works. After that you sit and wait for them to be written. But you know, the least known, the least famous writers, they are the better ones.
Rest in peace, Gabriel García Márquez. (via theatlantic)

You have touched many with your written words. REST IN PEACE.

(via theatlantic)

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The Day I Lost You

Or rather, the traces of hope that once entangled
Like ivy suffocating the whole of my heart
In desperate attempts to reach you
To tell you how much
I cared.

Muffled screams, silent sobs
Trying not to let a soul discover.
I guess you were my Sibyl Vane,
And I must have loved you the wrong way.

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If all else fails, delete every bit of evidence,memento…
Go to sleep and tell yourself that you will eventually forget 100 days from now.

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You were there, in the midst of winter
I plucked up my courage to approach you
You were beautiful, yet cruel.
To you, eternal love doesn’t exist
You pushed me away coldly

You are dazzlingly beautiful
Even though I knew it was impossible
Even if by a small miracle,
I knew that it wouldn’t be possible that you’d come looking for me
With cold words,
You froze my heart
I beg of you, please take my spiritless hand

I’ve thought of you countless times in the last four years, although in episodes, as if by fits of convulsions, triggered by a sudden stillness of being, or by some melancholic memory resurfacing. Time and again, the thoughts kept coming back , staying as long as they liked and leaving as abruptly as they came, but never really saying goodbye. There were always diversions, but their presence didn’t leave an imprint in my soul like you did.

Every time I stumbled upon a song that I fancied, I always found the lyrics to be reminiscent of you,even when I haven’t translated them yet.

I do not love you.

Or maybe I do, I’m not really sure.

You just keep popping in my head at the most random times.

Song: Ice Fortress by Dear Cloud

Lyric Source and Translation: www.princessoftea.com

Filed under dearcloud icefortress k-indie unrequited music korean translations

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Rabbids Invasion (Nickelodeon)
Four whimsical,white rabbits who thrive on mischief, adventure, curiosity, and experimentation that always end up in hilarious, and at times brilliantly executed, circumstances. It’s the usual slapstick comedy that one finds in many children’s channels, only this one does not feel as redundant or annoying (especially to twenty something people like me) as the ones in the same category. How a person my age got hooked on this show lies on the fact that it has lately become my medium for practicing dialogue construction, other than it’s actually entertaining as it is. Save for a few grunts, evil cackles and mischievous snickers, the rabbits don’t really utter anything intelligible. It’s the perfect prompt for coming up with  original humorous scripts and one-liners just basing on the rabbits’ attempts and reactions, and I need not censor myself ( except when my nephew is watching,too).
It is true that if you really want to write well, it pays to stop discriminating genres and material. The next great idea could be found on a children’s show or  in your Microwave Operation manual.
Photo credit: www.gamesradar.com

Rabbids Invasion (Nickelodeon)

Four whimsical,white rabbits who thrive on mischief, adventure, curiosity, and experimentation that always end up in hilarious, and at times brilliantly executed, circumstances. It’s the usual slapstick comedy that one finds in many children’s channels, only this one does not feel as redundant or annoying (especially to twenty something people like me) as the ones in the same category. How a person my age got hooked on this show lies on the fact that it has lately become my medium for practicing dialogue construction, other than it’s actually entertaining as it is. Save for a few grunts, evil cackles and mischievous snickers, the rabbits don’t really utter anything intelligible. It’s the perfect prompt for coming up with  original humorous scripts and one-liners just basing on the rabbits’ attempts and reactions, and I need not censor myself ( except when my nephew is watching,too).

It is true that if you really want to write well, it pays to stop discriminating genres and material. The next great idea could be found on a children’s show or  in your Microwave Operation manual.

Photo credit: www.gamesradar.com

Filed under write writingprompts writing ideas rabbids creative creativityprompts dialogue

511 notes

gobookyourself:

Remainder by Tom McCarthy

For more sanity-dissolving books about mental unraveling, try these next…

The Deep Whatsis by Peter Mattei for insight into the psychological devastations wrought by creative ad agencies

Here Lies Gerald by Robert Travieso for a delusional subway ride into mental collapse

Moby-Dick by Herman Melville for a book that’s less about finding a white whale and more about a monomaniac losing his mind 

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger to remind yourself that your childhood hero was suffering from a nervous breakdown

This post was guest edited by Benjamin Samuel, Co-Editor of Electric Literature and Recommended Reading. You can find him on Twitter.

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You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it.
That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.
Octavia E. Butler (via fictionwritingtips)

(via writeworld)

26 notes

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Reginald Hill, born 3 April 1936, died 12 January 2012
Seven Quotes
I had a kid brother who was five years younger than me and when he was left in my tender care, I would entertain him by making up stories. They were stories full of sudden death, blood, violence and narrow escapes.
If you’ve got something to say or a good story to tell then the greatest problem is writing to the end of it. If you can do that, then even if it’s not that good you have got something to work at.
I’ve got ideas scattered around; I write them in my notebook and keep them on my computer. Even as I am coming to the end of one book, ideas for the next are rolling around in my mind. I’ll pick up a few threads that I’ve sown before and see where they lead.
You are never alone with a novel. The characters become as real to me as real people.
When I get up in the morning, I ask my wife whether I should write a Booker prize-winning novel, or another best-selling crime book. We always come down on the side of the crime book.
Writing is like painting: a highlight here, a touch of colour there, can suggest more than an album of photographs can show.
The only bit of advice I would give is: when you finish that first manuscript and send it off to a publisher, start your second immediately. It will be infinitely better and you will have it finished by the time you get a reply about the first.
Hill was an English crime writer, and the winner in 1995 of the Crime Writers’ Association Cartier Diamond Dagger for Lifetime Achievement. He is best known for his crime novels about Dalziel and Pascoe, which were adapted for BBC television from 1996 to 2007
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Sound advice.

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Reginald Hill, born 3 April 1936, died 12 January 2012

Seven Quotes

  1. I had a kid brother who was five years younger than me and when he was left in my tender care, I would entertain him by making up stories. They were stories full of sudden death, blood, violence and narrow escapes.
  2. If you’ve got something to say or a good story to tell then the greatest problem is writing to the end of it. If you can do that, then even if it’s not that good you have got something to work at.
  3. I’ve got ideas scattered around; I write them in my notebook and keep them on my computer. Even as I am coming to the end of one book, ideas for the next are rolling around in my mind. I’ll pick up a few threads that I’ve sown before and see where they lead.
  4. You are never alone with a novel. The characters become as real to me as real people.
  5. When I get up in the morning, I ask my wife whether I should write a Booker prize-winning novel, or another best-selling crime book. We always come down on the side of the crime book.
  6. Writing is like painting: a highlight here, a touch of colour there, can suggest more than an album of photographs can show.
  7. The only bit of advice I would give is: when you finish that first manuscript and send it off to a publisher, start your second immediately. It will be infinitely better and you will have it finished by the time you get a reply about the first.

Hill was an English crime writer, and the winner in 1995 of the Crime Writers’ Association Cartier Diamond Dagger for Lifetime Achievement. He is best known for his crime novels about Dalziel and Pascoe, which were adapted for BBC television from 1996 to 2007

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Sound advice.